Oct 202015
 

ImpartialWhen I decided last year to change the direction of my series from not-having-a-distinct-genre to cosy mystery, I suddenly needed to find out how to write one.
I have read mysteries in all its forms for as long as I have been reading, including a large amount of cosies. But to go from loving to read a cosy to suddenly writing one, is a completely different story.

Here’s what I quickly found out about how to write a cosy mystery series.

  • The setting is a smallish local community. This can be a village, a hotel, a neighbourhood etc. There needs to be a good influx of ‘new blood’, otherwise it might become a bit unbelievable, with not many people left to ‘be murdered or be murderers’.
  • There is an amateur sleuth. There are exceptions, but in general the person who solves the crimes in a cosy is an amateur. They will however have contact with the local police, often in the form of a friend or family member. This gives the sleuth access to information about the murder, other people wouldn’t have. Often, but not necessarily, the sleuth is a woman.
  • The murder itself is not overly bloody or violent. Choking, smothering, poisoning etc. are accepted. Chainsaw hacking, not so much. On top of that the crime is not describes in too much detail. The ‘why’ the crime was perpetrated is far more important than ‘how’ it was done.
  • There are no overt sex scenes. Things like that happen behind closed doors.

Keeping these things in mind I realised that it is also important that the book is constructed in such a way that the reader is not already able to guess on page 2 who did it. This is easier said than done and requires careful planning.

A cosy mystery usually contains a so-called Web of Lies. This is a group of people who know each other well, but who keep secrets from each other. The victim is often an in general disliked person, sometimes part of the Web of Lies, on bad terms with a number of people, thus creating a list of suspects.
Even innocent people might become suspects, as, being part of the Web of Lies, they have secrets they like to keep under wraps. These secrets become the red herrings for the sleuth, covering up hopefully to the last page, who the real murderer is.

StringsI found that it is a lot of fun to create a Web of Lies. Maybe even the best part of writing a cosy. It doesn’t only contain ‘why’ the murder was done, but also a complex social structure between people, which the writer can make a deep as they like.
It took me three months to create my Web of Lies for Book 1, as new ideas and connections kept popping into my head, making the Web even more complicated.

Best thing of writing a series for me is that I get to create another Web of Lies for Book 2 and Book 3 and so on, all the way to Book 9. It’s great to be the devious mastermind that pulls the strings of imaginary characters, until they do just what you want!

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Oct 122015
 

ADuelgainst better judgement, I decided on having two heroes in my new series.
Now you might be wondering why that is wrong. Two heroes, more heroics, right?

Well, in general having two heroes is seen as a bad choice.
For instance, if only one of the main characters has a clear journey throughout the story, the other might feel like an annoying hanger-on. Or, if the goals and roles of the two main characters are too similar, why just not have one hero?

Despite these concerns, I decided on having two main characters. Perhaps I am too stubborn to listen to sound advice from people who have been writing fiction for years. Or perhaps I am making the rookie mistake of counting on beginners luck.
In any case, Jacob and Paddy are here to stay.

Let me explain why.
My series actually takes place in two worlds. A human world and a rat world. The rats live in the human world, but they have their own concerns and storyline.
But wouldn’t it then be better to write two stories? Each in their separate worlds? Well, no, as the two worlds do collide and influence each other.

I am writing a cosy mystery series, which means there are murders to be solved. Jacob is my (human) amateur sleuth, who unwillingly gets dragged into this and after a while starts to enjoy playing detective.
Paddy the Rat doesn’t actually help him solve the crimes. I don’t want anthropomorphic, Sherlockian rats in my series. However, unwittingly, Paddy might be of help every now and then, unknown to Jacob, of course.

Although my two worlds are very different, there are similarities as well. This is because a story can have two heroes, as long as their storylines are running parallel and are connected at the same time.
Jacob and Paddy each have their own lives to live and problems to solve. And although one is a human and one a rat, their problems are similar.

I am aware that I have bitten of a whole lot and might not be able to chew it all. It has, however, been great fun creating these two worlds and finding ways to connect them and have them influence each other.
I don’t think having two heroes is going to be a problem.

The journey of both my heroes is now well thought out and planned. This is not going to be an average cosy mystery series. Instead they are Cosy Mysteries with a Twist, two heroes and all!

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